We are family

 

More pockets! Yay!

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My Aunt Beatrice was a fashionista back in the day. My grandmother would make her the most beautiful dancing dresses to wear for the weekend. Whenever I think of her, I remember those gowns and I wanted her pocket to reflect this vintage attitude.

The foundation of the pocket is a powder-puff pink china silk. It is quilted over low loft polyester batting. The quilting stitches each have either a pearl seed bead or a pearlized sequin securing them. I draped a small swath of china silk diagonally from a beaded motif meant to look like a vintage brooch. The “brooch” was beaded onto heavy weight interfacing, then hand stitched to the pocket. It’s comprised of vintage bugle beads, sequins,  seed beads and some glass pearls. The outer edge is outlined in iridescent crystals and pearlized seed beads.

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“Your mamma wears army boots!”

Growing up, this was never really an insult. Personally, my mother never wore army boots, but my sister did. When I designed her pocket, I wanted it to reflect this mentality. When she had kids of her own, we used to joke that some playground child would say this and her children would rebuke with something like, “Well they’re actually 10-hole Dr. Martens. What’s your point?”

In her youth, my sister always had a rebellious streak to her nature. At one point, I could only tell her friends apart by the colors of their mohawks. When she went out to shows, she used to wear ripped stocking, cut-off miniskirts and patched-up leather biker jackets,  covered in punk band stickers and pins; now that she has kids, her style has cleaned up a bit, but that rebellious vein still permeates her everyday life.

For her pocket, I wanted to use a really utilitarian design, so I went ti a dimensional cargo pocket. For the cabochon in the center, I made a polymer clay cameo of a skull lady (from a mold) and dusted the surface with gold mica powder. The beading surrounding it is a combination of seed beads, facets, gemstones and sequins all in either black or smoky quartz with accents of red. The vines are simple chain stitches and the pocket flap secures with an industrial snap.

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My mom looks forward to the Houston Quilt Fest every year. She is in awe of the amazing quilts and loves to search the vendors for new and innovative gadgets and fabrics. She leans more towards the traditional quilts more than the art quilts, so I wanted her pocket to reflect this air. She had been talking recently about all of the vintage quilts she had been looking at and I decided to use colors that have that old school look.

For the central motif, I decided that it should be a Dresden plate because that is quite possibly, one of the most traditional and recognizable motifs in existence. The overall shape of the pocket is a potholder because back in the day, my mother used to sew for people, now that she sews for herself more, she loves making all the projects she never really had a chance to make and for a while there, she was making dozens of potholders. I have several of them in my kitchen and I use them on a daily basis. It’s a simple way to keep part of her close to me, always.

The sequins and seed beads alternate the blades of the plate and the outer edge is trimmed in small iridescent sequins, both round and in heart shapes. The center is finished off with a dimensional sequin flower.

More pockets on the way!

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2 thoughts on “We are family

  1. So wonderfully thought out and executed. These are fabulous pockets that are a real tribute to the woman you are honoring with them. Fabulous work Gilbert. Should make a ribbon or two or three or… 🙂

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